Elocution Lesson

elocution.gif

Adding to the list of words and phrases Tau has learned at 20 months. And I thought I’d attempt to show pronunciation because honestly, like most toddlers, you have to be around him for a while before you get what he’s saying.

In no particular order this time:

Choo-choo (train), tray (train), Pa-pa-pat (Postman Pat), MAN (man, always very emphatically), pees? (please), hap-pees (help, please), ala-hoo! (I love you!), wyes (lions) , DAT! (that! It’s all about DAT this week), truh (truck), bihe (bike), keez (keys), hair, bib, pah (pants), lellow (yellow), buh (bus), wah-wah (round and round, as in the wheels on the bus), boh (boat – as you can tell, we’re not big on end consonants yet), frah (frog), wahwah (flower, not to be confused with wah-wah, meaning “round and round”), POT-t (potty), bah (bath), wah (walk), rah-rah (run-run, as in “Run, run, as fast as you can; you can’t catch me I’m the gingerbread man”), pah (park), ree (read), phoh (phone), Kai-k (his cousin Kai), jacket, blangh (blanket), maaaaah (sheep noise), sssss (snake noise), chikgn (chicken), cah (cat), S (the letter) and also A and D, wah (wheels), alaha (elephant), bubbuh (bubbles), babah (balloon) and the easiest word in the world: pee!

Also, his teachers and classmates: Tatie (Katie), Ereh (Erin), Nah (Nat), Rarah (Miranda), Dyeda (Diana), Dillah (Dillon), Au-doo (August) and Mehmeh (Megan). He has a teacher and a classmate called Megan, both of whom are nicknamed Mehmeh. But he’s pretty taken with little Mehmeh and he will not say “Megan” even though we know he can. So he teases us:

“Tau, say Me-gan.”

Eyes crinkle. “Mehmeh!” Followed by a cheesy grin.

“No, not Mehmeh. ME-GAN.”

“Mehmeh!”

“Not Mehmeh. ME-GAN.”

“MEH. MEH!” Dissolves into laughter.

Huge joke, messing with your parents.

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2 responses to “Elocution Lesson

  1. Bless him, he’s growing so fast … but he still has to top Daddy’s “pear-shus”, Mommy’s “darning” and the “Quah-quah gus-ment lolly”

  2. Alas — no “gus-ment lollies” (cement lorries) in the US. We have to make do with “truck” for all kinds of vehicles! Haven’t decided whether it’s easier for him or more confusing. No bakkies either.

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